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My Google Reader Bundle

I made a bundle of some of my favorite feeds using Google Reader’s new bundle feature. Subscribe to it here. Pretty sweet way of sharing feeds with other people.

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Mobile Marketing

Mobile marketing will be getting more and more important as Internet connectivity become ubiquitous. Imagine being in a city and not knowing where to go get a bite to eat with friends. You pull out your hand held computer and ask it to pull all the restaurants within a 5 mile radius of where you are. Then you can check your social network to see if anyone is currently at any of those places, read their past reviews, look at real time streaming video inside of all the different bars to see which one has the best vibe and see if any of the restaurants currently have offers or coupons they are sending out. It will be something like this eventually. Mashable had an article about Coupious:

delivering on-demand, location-based coupons to smartphone users for savings at the point of sale. Coupious works by using your phone’s GPS to provide location-based coupons relevant to your immediate whereabouts. Essentially, all you need to do is launch the application to find deals within walking distance or up to 50 miles away.

There are so many cool implications with mobile internet. I had an idea once to make a site that shows where all the best skate spots were so if you were in the city you could look at your handset and see the closest spots to where you were. And then I found out that subpublic.com beat me to my great idea. Although the problem with the idea is creating incentives enough to get kids to upload skate spots. Do a search on Denver and there are no spots uploaded.

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Newspapers Are Mistaken

I think it’s kind of funny how newspaper people see Google as a business model that is dependent on content taken from others including newspapers. Google doesn’t take content, its sends an audience to them. It allows people to find your article, it doesn’t take it away. Another Jeff Jarvis quote:

Content is becoming a cost burden, what you have to have to get the links, but in and of itself, content can’t draw value without an audience, without links…links are presents that can be given or earned but not bought. But the AP is still operating in the content economy, which values control instead. That age has passed.

I like Jarvis’s explaining of the link economy:

This changes the dynamic of editorial decisions. Instead of saying, “we should have that” (and replicating what is already out there) you say, “what do we do best?” That is, “what is our unique value?” It means that when you sit down to see a story that others have worked on, you should ask, “can we do it better?” If not, then link. And devote your time to what you can do better.

As people adhere to the new rules of the link economy the best stuff is credited and the reader’s ability to get the information they want is improved:

This leads to a new Golden Rule of Links in journalism — link unto others’ good stuff as you would have them link unto your good stuff. This emerges from blogging etiquette but is exactly contrary to the old, competitive ways of news organizations: wasting now-precious resources matching competitors’ stories so you could say you’d done it yourself. That must change.

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Twitter Hype

I’m kind of tierd of being bombarded by Twitter news. Everywhere I look another article on some new Twitter tool or How To article. From Mashable:twitterdisillusionment

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In online marketing, 1% makes all the difference

In Seth Godin’s book, Meatball Sundae, he describes how in just about every community, only 1 percent of the people are the givers. In Wikipedia, for example, 1 percent of the users create and edit articles. 1 percent of readers contribute comments on blogs. 1 percent of readers Digg articles.

The hard part, Godin explains, is that you don’t know who they are. You don’t know which 1 percent of your customers and prospects are the ones who want to post about their experience.

And, 61% of respondents to a recent survey said they check review sites, blogs and other customer feedback forums before buying a new product or service.

Word of mouth spreads further and faster today than ever before. Take advantage of it.

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The Slight Edge in Online Marketing

I finished the book The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson the other day. Applying it to marketing online is easy: new media and new tools online are really easy to use like setting up a Facebook page or starting a blog. And every action that is easy to do, is also easy not to do. Why are these crucial things easy not to do? Because if you don’t do them it wont kill you…at least not today.

If you post in your blog and comment on a couple other blogs today will your Business change? Probably not. If you don’t do those things will your business fall apart? of course not. No success is immediate and no failure is instantaneous.
We live in a results focused world. With the flip of a switch or click of a button we want to see results. But the real definition of success is: the progressive realization of a worthy ideal.
Seth has commented on this many times:

The irony of the web is that the tactics work really quickly. You friend someone on Facebook and two minutes later, they friend you back. Bang. But the strategy still takes forever. The strategy is the hard part, not the tactics.

I discovered a lucky secret the hard way about thirty years ago: you can outlast the other guys if you try. If you stick at stuff that bores them, it accrues. Dripdripdrip you win.It still takes ten years to become a success, web or no web. The frustrating part is that you see your tactics fail right away. The good news is that over time, you get the satisfaction of watching those tactics succeed right away.

It’s more like 35 semi-fell swoops that do the trick. And deep down, we realize that. But, now that we’ve said it out loud, now that you acknowledge that you’re going to need 35 web visits or permission-based emails or 35 different conference appearances or 35 blog posts or whatever, dripdripdrip… if you know that you need 35, not one, how would write/appear/act differently?

Drip, drip, drip goes the Twit:

Publishing your ideas… in books, or on a blog, or in little twits on Twitter… and doing it with patience, over time, is the best way I can think of to lay a foundation for whatever it is you hope to do next.

So get started and make incremental steps toward the goal even if they seem inconsequential at the time.

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